Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program

Scholar giving a lecture
Dr. Reginald Oputa lecturing at his host institution, Pima Community College.

The Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence (S-I-R) Program is a unique Fulbright Scholar Program initiative that is specifically driven by the goals of U.S. institutions of higher education to enhance internationalization efforts on their campuses. Through the S-I-R Program, institutions host a scholar from outside of the United States for a semester or full academic year to teach courses, assist in curriculum development, guest lecture, develop study abroad/exchange partnerships and engage with the campus and the local community. S-I-Rs work across departments and curricula in a variety of ways to widely enhance or expand an existing international program, develop new world area studies programs, add an international dimension to existing coursework or provide an opportunity for U.S. students to learn about a particular world region or country.

The institution benefits from the expertise provided, and the Scholar attains experience in the U.S. higher education arena. The community, through the institution, provides the Visiting Scholar with opportunities to participate in speaking engagements, community meetings, and other grassroots activities. Through this, the institution can diversify the experiences of – and build goodwill among – the community. The S-I-R Program promotes cultural and intellectual diversity among the institution and the wider community.

S-I-R applicant institutions may and are encouraged to propose topics in the full range of academic fields to suit their institution’s internationalization needs. 

Please see Application Steps for more details on submitting an application.

Webinars and Resources:

The Fulbright S-I-R Program hosts frequent webinars about Fulbright the S-I-R awards, application process, and impact panels. Recorded sessions are posted one week following the live event. S-I-R webinars in 2022 include:

2023-2024 S-I-R Webinar Recordings:

View S-I-R webinar archive

Contact the S-I-R Team:

sir@iie.org

Grant Duration

A semester to full academic year.

Deadline Description
  • The program is open to all accredited U.S. institutions of higher education. Non-U.S. institutions are ineligible. The institution must be in compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 requiring nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs.
  • Foreign scholars are eligible to serve as Scholars-in-Residence. U.S. citizens and permanent residents are ineligible.
  • Scholar teaching responsibilities are limited to a maximum of two courses per semester.
  • Proposals shall not authorize engagement in pastoral, missionary, or other professional religious activities.
  • Proposals shall not authorize engagement in activities for which a license to practice medicine or nursing is required.
  • U.S. institutions may not host Fulbright Scholar-In-Residence participants in consecutive academic years.  An institution hosting an S-I-R in a given academic year must wait one academic before hosting a subsequent S-I-R. Preference will be given to applicants who have not previously received a Scholar-in-Residence award. 

Application for Institutions

The application for the 2023-24 Scholar-in-Residence (S-I-R) Program is now closed.

Application Resources

Close All | Open All

Regions/Countries Participating in S-I-R from where the individual scholar may reside
AFRICA, SUB-SAHARAN EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC EUROPE AND EURASIA
Angola
Benin
Botswana
Burkina Faso
Cameroon
Cote d’Ivoire
Democratic Republic
of Congo
Ethiopia
Ghana
Guinea
Kenya
Madagascar
Malawi
Mali
Mauritius
Mozambique
Namibia
Niger
Nigeria
Rwanda
Senegal
Sierra Leone
South Africa
Swaziland
Tanzania
Togo
Uganda
Zambia
Zimbabwe
Australia
Brunei
Burma
Cambodia
Indonesia
Japan
Laos
Malaysia
Mongolia
New Zealand
Philippines
Singapore
South Korea
South Pacific
Taiwan
Thailand
Timor-Leste
Vietnam
Albania
Andorra
Armenia
Austria
Azerbaijan
Belarus
Belgium/Luxembourg
Bosnia-Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Georgia
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Iceland
Ireland
Italy
Kosovo
Latvia
Lithuania
Malta
Moldova
Montenegro
Netherlands
North Macedonia
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russian Federation
Serbia
Slovak Republic
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
Ukraine
United Kingdom
MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA SOUTH AND CENTRAL ASIA WESTERN HEMISPHERE

Algeria
Bahrain
Egypt
Israel
Iraq (project focused on cultural heritage and preservation)
Jordan
Kuwait
Lebanon

Libya
Morocco
Palestinian Territories
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Tunisia
United Arab Emirates
Bangladesh
Bhutan
India
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyz Republic
Nepal
Pakistan
Sri Lanka
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Argentina
Bahamas
Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean
Belize
Bolivia
Brazil
Canada
Chile
Colombia
Costa Rica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
Guatemala
Guyana
Haiti
Honduras
Jamaica
Mexico
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Suriname
Trinidad/Tobago
Uruguay
Venezuela

Note: Geographical listings in this publication are a matter of administrative convenience and are not intended to imply a United States government position on the legal status of the areas listed.

Tips for Crafting a Competitive Application

The Fulbright Program is committed to partnering with U.S. institutions of higher education to bolster their internationalization efforts. Fulbright's Scholar-in-Residence program connects a diverse range of U.S. institutions with scholars from other countries for an exchange experience that benefits the host and scholar alike. Institutions interested in applying to host a foreign scholar through the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program are encouraged to follow these five tips to ensure a strong proposal.

  • INTERNATIONALIZATION IMPACT: The S-I-R program is driven by your institution's needs and interests. Demonstrate how your S-I-R program will contribute to key internationalization goals at your institution, no matter your current level of international engagement. Teaching is central to the S-I-R Program. Link your scholar's activities and expertise to your proposed teaching program and its impact on student learning as well as any relevant measures related to curriculum development, broad cross-campus engagement, community outreach/engagement, establishing an exchange partnership, or other indicators. Envision the impact you aspire to reach by hosting a scholar. Enlist the support of your institution's leadership to show commitment to your proposal beyond the hosting department and to raise the profile and impact of the S-I-R at your institution. Address in your proposal what types of future communication and follow-on projects you would like to ensure are in place after the scholar returns to their home country. 
  • DIVERSITY, EQUITY, & INCLUSION: The Fulbright Program strives to ensure that it represents U.S. society and societies abroad and demonstrates diversity and inclusion in different ways. In the case of the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program, whether your institution is considered a diverse institution or not, show how your S-I-R will engage with diverse students, faculty, and staff. Demonstrate how your S-I-R will gain an understanding of diversity through interaction with diverse citizens in your local community.
  • SCHOLAR: If you are naming a specific scholar, be sure to explain why you have selected this individual and in what capacity you know this individual. If you are requesting assistance with recruitment, select up to two countries within one world region and include a clear rationale for selecting these countries. Tie the specialization of your chosen or desired scholar to the activities you detail in your proposal and to your institution's internationalization goals. 
  • SUPPORT: Detail your plan for curriculum, registration, workspace, and classroom requirements, ensuring your plan adheres to the recommended teaching load of 1-2 courses per semester. Share your plan to involve and support your scholar in your campus community, including assigning both a faculty and staff point person to address concerns throughout the S-I-R's program. Think creatively about the support that your institution might be able to give in-kind in terms of airport transit and local transportation, housing, and/or meal plans.
  • COMMUNITY: Detail campus or community resources the scholar would benefit from or contribute to, whether personally or professionally (campus libraries/archives, labs, training opportunities, working groups, local conferences, etc.). Collect letters from local organizations (e.g. local libraries, cultural centers, local media, or schools/school districts) that pledge to work with you and support the scholar during their exchange. Share your strategy for getting the word out about your S-I-R's visit to your campus and local community, whether through events, press releases, social media, or other means. 

Potential Impact, Outcomes, and Benefits to the Host Institution and Community

  • The proposal provides a clear view of the institution’s current and proposed internationalization efforts and details how the Scholar-in-Residence contributes to the institution’s short- and long-term internationalization goals
  • The project shows considerable academic and activities, plans for other campus activities, community outreach activities, professional enrichment opportunities for the scholar, and the sustainable impact of the S-I-R’s presence
  • The proposal demonstrates the need for the project to be completed with a scholar from the specified region or country

Quality of Proposal

  • The proposed Academic Program of the scholar is feasible and the scholar profile meets the program’s needs
  • Demonstrates an institution’s capacity with sufficient resources to support a scholar’s program on campus and in the larger community
  • The institution shows commitment to the Scholar-in-Residence with adequate plans for oversight

Diversity and Inclusion

  • The proposal demonstrates attention to diversity and inclusion in terms of the S-I-R’s academic activities, interaction with diverse students, faculty, and staff, and engagement with the diverse surrounding community. The S-I-R is able to experience the diversity of America and American first-hand.

Previous Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Awards to Institutions

  • U.S. institutions may not host Fulbright Scholar-In-Residence participants in consecutive academic years.  An institution hosting an S-I-R in a given academic year must wait one academic before hosting a subsequent S-I-R. Preference will be given to applicants who have not previously received a Scholar-in-Residence award.
  • The proposal provides compelling justification for previous or repeat Scholar-in-Residence placements, if applicable

Other Considerations

  • Proposals from colleges and universities that serve minority student populations and/or those that have infrequently hosted foreign scholars are highly valued in the S-I-R program competition and are strongly encouraged to apply. Such institutions include but are not limited to: American Indian and Alaska Native Serving Institutions(AIANSIs), Asian American and Native American/Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions(AANAPISIs), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs), Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Predominantly Black Institutions (PBIs), Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), military academies, rural colleges and universities, small liberal arts colleges, and community colleges.
  • Proposals will be accepted from single institutions as well as jointly from two institutions.

Regarding the Individual Scholar

  • One of the objectives of the Fulbright Program is to provide an educational exchange experience to those not previously afforded such an opportunity.
  • Foreign citizens desiring to hold or holding permanent residence in the United States are not eligible for Fulbright grants.
  • The policies of the FFSB require that preference is given to scholars who have not previously received Fulbright grants, taught, studied, conducted research, or worked in the United States for an extended period of time within the past five years.
Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Alumni Stories

Otterbein University hosted Argentinian scholar Andrea Pac during the 2019-2020 school year. Dr. Pac taught courses on Latin American history, culture, literature, and film. She collaborated and co-taught with Dr. Kristina Escondo, Assistant Professor in the Department of Modern Languages & Cultures, on a new Global Cultures course in Otterbein’s General Education curriculum: “Latin America: Orientations, Perspectives, Contexts.” Dr. Pac delivered talks to the campus community on considering and reading the work of Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza. She also assisted in the hosting of Woodrow Wilson Fellow Dr. Anita Perez Ferguson and Dr. Mu Chun on Otterbein’s campus.

Randolph-Macon College hosted Professor Lucien Lameijer of The Netherlands during the 2019-2020 academic year. Dr. Lameijer designed, developed and taught courses in carbohydrate chemistry and pseudoscience, which have become a regular part of the college’s offerings. While in the United States, participated in the American Chemical Society (ACS) events. Dr. Lameijer was scheduled to be the keynote speaker at the March 2020 local meeting in Virginia. While the event was canceled due to Covid-19, he was featured in their monthly publication and his presentation was posted on the website. Dr. April Marchetti, Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Honors Program, writes that “students were exposed to pathways and careers in chemistry that they would not have been had this opportunity not been provided to us, as well as a cultural exchange that wouldn’t have happened otherwise.”

Reach Institute for School Leadership hosted Dr. Yoshiko Kitada during the 2019-2020 academic year. Dr. Kitada participated in faculty and class meetings and served as an active member of the Institute’s master’s candidate panel. She visited with practicing elementary school teachers and intern teachers to learn how the Institute trains and prepares students to work in K-12 schools. Dr. Kitada shared her expertise in Japanese Lesson Study and worked with Institute faculty to bring their work to a digital platform and delivery.

SUNY Geneseo hosted Professor William Kofi Anyan of Ghana during the 2019-2020 academic year. Dr. Anyan taught immunology and parasitology courses, spoke with student clubs, and worked with a total of 16 research students. Dr. Susan Bandoni Muench, Professor in Biology, notes that his expertise in schistosomiasis, a disease not normally observed in the United States, inspired students “to think beyond the local, expand their knowledge of global health problems, become concerned about social justice… and apply their knowledge to make the world a better place.” In addition to his campus duties, Dr. Anyan traveled to Boston and Kentucky to attend Fulbright meetings.

Tennessee State University hosted Turkish scholar Murat Culduz during the 2019-2020 academic year.  Dr. Culduz served as primary, secondary, or guest lecturer in several English and Literature courses. He worked closes with the Intensive English center to review all thirty courses to prepare for CEA accreditation and helped build the IELTS Test Prep Program for international students. Dr. Culduz also participated in numerous activities organized by and for the Humphrey Fellows housed at Vanderbilt University. A protocol was signed between Tennessee State University and Istanbul Medipol University, which allows students to attend TSU Intensive English Center for their language studies.

Tulsa Community College and University of Tulsa hosted Dr. Kendra Reynolds of Northern Ireland during the 2019-2020 academic year. Dr. Reynolds creative writing at the University of Tulsa and an honors composition course at TCC. She worked with faculty to infuse poetry and its merits in the college’s curriculum where possible, including in English, theater, physiology, and anatomy classes. Dr. Reynolds helped build connections and collaborations with Ulster University’s English and theater departments. She now serves an advisory role to developing TCC’s global theater project. Her campus events included an interdisciplinary lecture with child development faculty on the importance of poetry for young children, and a workshop with physical therapy students on using poetry as a tool for learning to write succinctly. She taught a community course on Irish poetry through TCC’s Continuing Education program, and through the Outreach Lecturing Fund, presented a talk a Northeast Nazarene College in Boston. In Oklahoma, Dr. Reynolds had the opportunity to meet and visit with Poet Laureate Joy Harjo.

Western Washington University hosted Mongolian scholar Baya Dashdondog during the 2019-2020 academic year. Dr. Dashdondog provided support in enriching exchange programs, especially improving exchange between Western Washington and the National University of Mongolia. She lectured in the History and East Asian Studies departments. Additionally, Dr. Dashdondog was invited to speak and meet with students at the University of Northern Georgia. She delivered her talk, “Armenian Cultural Interactions with the Mongols during the Conquest Era,” at the university’s two main campuses.

Whitworth University hosted Italian scholar Gianni Nicolini during the 2019-2020 academic year. Dr. Nicolini brought knowledge of European Union business practices and expertise in international markets to Whitworth’s undergraduate Economic courses. He spoke with student-led finance groups and assisted the Whitworth Student Investment Group in preparation for a competition that they later won. Dr. Nicolini collaborated with Professor Robin Henager on a study of financial literacy, comparing the United States to eight countries in Western Europe.

Wittenberg University and Antioch College hosted Professor Nermina Mujagić of Bosnia-Herzegovina during the 2019-2020 academic year. Dr. Mujagić led courses in Political Science and Political Economy for undergraduate and graduate students. “Her teaching infused the curriculum with a stronger and lasting international perspective and provided focused, creative, and meaningful study of political and social conflict in former-Yugoslavia,” writes Dr. Keith Doubt, Professor Emeritus in Sociology. Dr. Mujagić attended many campus and community events, including a student-choreographed performance influenced by her teaching. The theme was a plea for understanding and empathy for the plight of refugees globally and included a text provided and translated by Dr. Mujagić. Two student essays from her classes were so strong that they were published in the interdisciplinary, online, bilingual journal, Duh Bosne / Spirit of Bosnia

Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Awarded Institutions
Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Institutions by Location

Updated: May 22, 2018
Source: Google Map
Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Institutions by location since 2007

 

FAQs | Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Program

  1. My institution does not have much experience writing and submitting proposals. How can we prepare a competitive application for a Fulbright S-I-R award?
  2. Is preference given to proposals with named scholars?
  3. Our institution is planning to name a specific scholar - are there specific requirements?
  4. What is the process for scholar recruitment?
  5. My institution already has strong international ties. Are we eligible to apply for an S-I-R award?
  6. Our institution is interested in hosting a professional from another country, is this appropriate?
  7. I am a non-U.S. citizen interested in participating as a scholar. How can I apply for the Scholar-in-Residence Program?
  8. Our institution proposes to bring a scholar who is not in the humanities or social sciences. Is it appropriate for us to apply for an S-I-R award?
  9. Our institution would like to apply for an S-I-R award and name someone who was recently in the United States on a Fulbright Scholar award. Is this acceptable?
  10. What are some examples of community engagement?
  11. What kind of documentation is required in support of community outreach activities?
  12. What are the criteria for selecting institutions for the S-I-R award?
  13. Can an institution submit more than one application within the same cycle?
  14. Which is the most important goal of the program: to serve the institution or to serve the scholar?
  15. If our proposal is selected for an Award, is the funding provided to our institution or to the Scholar?
  16. My institution has limited resources. Is cost-sharing required? What can we offer in the way in-kind support in lieu of direct financial support?
  17. What do the Accident and Sickness Health Benefits for the Scholar cover?
  18. Is the Scholar-in-Residence Award for teaching only?
  19. Our institution seeks to bring a scholar to teach foreign language. Is it appropriate for us to apply for an S-I-R award?
  20. Can our institution apply to host an S-I-R to teach English as a second language or foreign language (ESL/EFL)?

  1. My institution does not have much experience writing and submitting proposals. How can we prepare a competitive application for a Fulbright S-I-R award?
    The S-I-R program welcomes first-time applicants and encourages all applicants to discuss their proposals with the IIE. Join us during weekly office hours while the competition is open. S-I-R program staff is happy to provide guidance on developing a strong proposal, support identifying a suitable scholar, and answer questions throughout the application season. Contact us at sir@iie.org.
     
  2. Is preference given to proposals with named scholars?
    No. It is not necessary to name a scholar. U.S. Embassies and Fulbright Commissions abroad are quite willing to recruit candidates. Contact IIE for assistance connecting with contacts in the proposed host country or countries of requested scholars.
     
  3. Our institution is planning to name a specific scholar - are there specific requirements?
    If you request a scholar by name, be specific about the reasons for selecting that particular individual. Relate the scholar's qualifications to the proposed activities, including how the proposed scholar's academic credentials, standing, and English language skills are appropriate for the proposed activities, their teaching/lecturing experience, and in what ways has your institution been engaged with this scholar previously. Within the application, provide the Scholar's biographical information, copy of their CV and 2 letters of recommendation, including one from the Scholar’s direct supervisor at their home institution. If selected, the individual scholar will connect with the home country Fulbright office to submit additional required material. A separate application from the individual scholar is not submitted at this time. 
  4. What is the process for scholar recruitment?
    If you request scholar recruitment, IIE coordinates with U.S. Embassies and Fulbright Commissions abroad to recruit for your institution. Within the application, you will be required to select two countries from within a specific world region from which you would like the scholar to originate; the discipline or field of expertise, theoretical orientation (if applicable), and subjects/issues about which you wish the scholar to be particularly knowledgeable; and the scholar’s preferred qualifications including academic degree level and years of teaching experience. U.S. Embassies and/or Fulbright Commissions in the relevant countries will conduct recruitment efforts to identify a suitable scholar(s) who fits the desired criteria. When recruitment is concluded, each country nominates 1-2 scholars for review. Once approved by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, materials from potential scholars will be forwarded to your institution for final selection.
     
  5. My institution already has strong international ties. Are we eligible to apply for an S-I-R award?
    Yes, the Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence competition does not exclude institutions with existing international programs or those that have other opportunities to host visiting scholars, but these types of institutions need to demonstrate clearly how the proposed S-I-R will significantly enhance or expand any existing international program, serve the students and the campus, and benefit the surrounding Community. Proposals that provide a clear view of the institution’s current internationalization efforts and details how the Scholar-in-Residence contributes to the institution’s short- and long-term internationalization goals will be competitive.
     
  6. Our institution is interested in hosting a professional from another country, is this appropriate?
    Yes, institutions are encouraged to consider not only academics but professionals in the media, government, the arts, and from other fields. Professionals have successfully participated in the S-I-R Program. S-I-R’s can teach courses, assist in curriculum development, guest lecture, develop study abroad/exchange partnerships and engage with the campus and the local community. They should have had some previous teaching experience and must have the requisite English teaching skills.
     
  7. I am a non-U.S. citizen interested in participating as a scholar. How can I apply for the Scholar-in-Residence Program?
    The Scholar-in-Residence Program allows for U.S. institutions to apply to host a potential visiting scholar.  Individual scholars may not apply directly.  If you are in contact with a U.S. institution that has expressed interest in hosting a Scholar-in-Residence, encourage them to connect with us at sir@iie.org and connect with your home country’s Fulbright office. In addition, please be encouraged to explore opportunities within the Fulbright Visiting Scholar Program.
      
  8. Our institution proposes to bring a scholar who is not in the humanities or social sciences. Is it appropriate for us to apply for an S-I-R award?
    While the majority of proposals are in the humanities and social sciences, proposals in all disciplines are welcomed as long as the scholar brings an international and/or comparative perspective to the courses taught, and to the department/ institution. Non-traditional and interdisciplinary proposals have featured scholars in the fields of architecture, urban studies, international studies, environmental studies, women’s studies, journalism, performing and creative arts and other disciplines. Regardless of the discipline, it is encouraged to outline in the proposal how the scholar will add an international perspective to courses in their field and other programs on campus, particularly if proposing a scholar in disciplines such as business or the natural sciences.
     
  9. Our institution would like to apply for an S-I-R award and name someone who was recently in the United States on a Fulbright Scholar award. Is this acceptable?
    Preference is given to scholars who have not previously served as a Fulbright scholar and has not had opportunities to teach, study or conduct research in the United States for an extended period within the past five years. If you request a scholar with such recent experience in the United States, the proposal must give special justification (please check with IIE regarding questions about the eligibility of the scholar). Additionally, any named scholar should be mindful of any restrictions that may be tied to their prior U.S. visa (i.e., for J1, the 24-month bar).
     
  10. What are some examples of cross-campus and community engagement?
    The individual scholar is expected to connect with the broader campus and with the surrounding community, not just the hosting department or academic center. The campus and community engagement piece should indicate: a) in what ways the scholar will engage with students, faculty, and staff across campus such as guest lecturing, student and faculty advising, interacting with clubs and organizations, committee service, camous events, etc., and b), what educational, social, cultural and business/professional organizations, activities and events in the community might be attractive to a Scholar-in-Residence and to which they can contribute. Some examples have included guest lecture series, film series from their home country, visits to local secondary schools, interaction with local media, etc. These should be resources where the scholar can learn from the community and where the community can learn from the scholar, on and off campus.
     
  11. What kind of documentation is required in support of community outreach activities?
    Provide letters from civic, professional, social, and cultural community organizations, schools and school districts, and other groups or organizations expressing an interest in hosting the S-I-R for substantive public speaking engagements and other outreach activities, demonstrating support for the scholar. These letters can be addressed to the Fulbright S-I-R Review Committee or to your institution and will be uploaded directly into the application.
     
  12. What are the criteria for selecting institutions for the S-I-R award?
    There are two principal factors reviewers consider: (1) the benefits of the proposed program to the institution and (2) the quality of the program proposed, including the academic activities, other campus activities, community outreach activities, , professional enrichment opportunities for the scholar and the sustainable impact of the S-I-R’s presence. Visit the Review Criteria tab for further details.
     
  13. Can an institution submit more than one application within the same cycle?
    While an institution may submit more than one application from different departments, only one proposal from the institution will be funded. We recommend applicants speak with their leadership to coordinate cross-departmental needs and efforts to submit a single application. An application from an institution proposing to host a scholar in two different departments simultaneously or for a semester each will be considered, provided that the scholar has the requisite experience and expertise.
     
  14. Which is the most important goal of the program: to serve the institution or to serve the scholar?
    Service to the institution is the most important goal. Other Fulbright Programs support scholars who are selected to pursue their own research and lecturing interests. The Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence (S-I-R) Program is a unique Fulbright Scholar Program initiative that is specifically driven by the goals of U.S. institutions of higher education to enhance internationalization efforts on their campuses.
     
  15. If our proposal is selected for an Award, is the funding provided to our institution or to the Scholar?
    Fulbright grant benefits are provided directly to the individual Scholar, disbursed by IIE and include: round-trip international air travel, a monthly stipend, a monthly allowance for up to two dependents, and initial settling-in and professional allowances. IIE will issue the DS2019 form in support of J-visa sponsorship. For a complete list of grant benefits, please review the “Information for named or recruited S-I-R candidates” resource on the Application tab.
     
  16. My institution has limited resources. Is cost-sharing required? What can we offer in the way in-kind support in lieu of direct financial support?
    Some higher education institutions are able to provide direct financial support and in-kind support. Others may not be able to do so.  Direct financial support from institutions is not required for the Scholar-in-Residence Program.  Grant benefits for the Fulbright S-I-R include: round-trip international air travel, a monthly stipend,  a monthly allowance for up to two dependents, and initial settling-in and professional allowances. Host institutions are encouraged to think creatively about ways they can provide in-kind support to ensure a successful experience for the scholar. Institutions are encouraged to provide in-kind support. Some examples of in-kind support include providing housing, access to transportation, airport pick-up/drop-off, on-campus meal tickets, apartment furnishing, professional allowances for scholars to attend conferences, etc. Please consult the S-I-R Program contact for more information.
     
  17. What do the Accident and Sickness Health Benefits for the Scholar cover?
    The U.S. Department of State provides essential accident and sickness coverage for Fulbright Scholars under a self-funded group policy called the Accident and Sickness Program for Exchanges (ASPE). This policy is not intended to cover preventative care such as annual examinations or check-ups. The Accident and Sickness Program for Exchanges Booklet is available at Seven Corners
     
  18. Is the Scholar-in-Residence Award for teaching only?
    Teaching is central to the S-I-R’s responsibilities, within and across departments and curricula in a variety of ways to enhance or expand existing international programming, develop new world area studies programs, add an international dimension to existing coursework or provide an opportunity for students to learn about a particular world region or country.  Beyond that, S-I-Rs are expected to engage with students, scholars, and staff across campus in a variety of ways and to interact with the surrounding community.  Scholar teaching responsibilities are limited to a maximum of two courses per semester.
     
  19. Our institution seeks to bring a scholar to teach a foreign language. Is it appropriate for us to apply for an S-I-R award?
    Proposals requesting foreign language teaching must also have the Scholar-in-Residence teach about their home country's customs, culture, and society. If you are seeking a scholar to only teach a foreign language, we suggest you consider applying to host a Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistant rather than a Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence.
     
  20. Can our institution apply to host an S-I-R to teach English as a second language or foreign language (ESL/EFL)?
    Proposals requesting a scholar to teach English as a second language or foreign language are not eligible.