Fulbright International Education Administrator Award

U.S.-Korea International Education Administrator Program

Application Deadline
Tuesday, November 1, 2022
Award Code
13580-KS
Activity Type
Seminar
  Opportunities for international education professionals and senior higher education officials to engage in a two-week intensive seminar to learn about the host country’s education system and establish networks. This is the activity that corresponds with the Fulbright International Education Administrator Award
Degree Requirements
Ph.D. (or other terminal degree) not required
Career Profile
Higher Education Administrators and Executives
Awards are open to those who have been working in the capacity of administrators or executives with a focus on the international dimensions of their campuses.

Number of recipients

Up To
8
Award Start Period
June 2023
Award Length
2 weeks
Flex Option
No
Country
Korea
Multi-Country/Area Award
No
Scholars selected for this award will be required to
Participate in a two-week group seminar

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars may be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities‎.

Award Activity

Established in 1995, the U.S.-Korea International Education Administrator Award is also known as the American International Education Administrator (AIEA) Award. Open to individuals involved directly with students in the promotion of international education, either through higher education institutions or non-profit exchange organizations in the U.S., the program offers two weeks of guided exposure to the Korean higher education system. AIEA participants visit colleges and universities, as well as government and private sector agencies, and meet with relevant personnel in order to become acquainted with the philosophy, organization, and management of Korean higher and international education programs. Cultural excursions supplement professional and academic visits.

Often referred to as an “educational powerhouse,” Korea places a distinct value on education linked to early recognition of its importance in economic mobility and development throughout Korea’s history, and particularly its history since the Korean War in the early 1950s. As with the rest of the country, Korea’s higher education system has seen rapid growth since the end of the Korean War. Today, Korea boasts over 400 higher education institutions, primarily categorized as junior/community colleges (2-3 years), universities (4 years), and graduate schools. 

With the spread in popularity of Korean culture, language, and arts worldwide, popularly known as the “Hallyu Wave,” in recent years, Korean higher education institutions have seen an increase in the number of international students choosing to pursue advanced study in Korea. According to the 2021 Open Doors report, published by the Institute for International Education (IIE), during the 2019-2020 academic year, South Korea ranked 17th among the top 25 destinations of U.S. study abroad students. 

The U.S. also remains a popular study abroad destination for Korean students, with Korea consistently ranking as the third-largest origin of international students after China and India (a fact particularly significant considering the difference in population size between Korea and these two countries). Thus, the Korean higher education system is uniquely placed to influence the future of international education, while fostering educational and cultural exchange between the United States and Korea. 

Locations Detail

Various higher education institutions throughout Korea: The first week of visits for AIEA participants is typically spent in Seoul, home to over 80 of the nation’s higher education institutions, and the second week of visits is spent outside of Seoul, offering an opportunity to explore international education in a range of urban, suburban, and rural localities.

Award Length and Period

Tentative program period: June 11-24, 2023

Citizenship/Residency Requirement
Applicants residing in the award country at the time of application or thereafter are not eligible to apply for this award.
Dual citizens of the award country are not eligible to apply for this award.
Invitation Requirement
A letter of invitation should not be sought.
Language Proficiency Requirements
None, English is sufficient.
Additional Qualification Information

Applicants must meet the following qualifications:

  • Be a higher education administrator or program director who works directly with students on a day-to-day basis and who is actively involved in promoting international education on their campus (for example, foreign student advisor, study abroad advisor, or international student office director)
  • Be affiliated with a two- or four-year college or university, or a non-profit international education exchange organization
  • Have a minimum of five years of full-time work experience in international education

Preference given to applicants:

  • Without significant professional visits to Korea in the past five years

An applicant must clearly demonstrate that these criteria have been met (in CV and/or project statement) in order to be considered eligible. An applicant’s statement should include the number of Korean students currently at their home institution campus.

Additional Comments

Program participants will follow a demanding and intensive pre-arranged schedule with little time available for individual projects or appointments, unless undertaken at the conclusion of the program at the participant's expense. As such, this program is not intended as a vehicle for initiating or developing U.S. institutions' linkage programs, for student recruitment, or for the establishment of branch campuses.  

Accompanying dependents are not permitted.

Award Allowances

Program participants receive round-trip international airfare, lodging, and a per diem that includes a meal allowance for those meals not provided.

Final grant amounts will be determined prior to the start of the academic year and are subject to the availability of funds. The United States Department of State and the Fulbright Commission in the host country reserve the right to alter, without notice, participating countries, number of awards and allowances.

Korea

What is life like for Fulbrighters in your country?

Often referred to as an “educational powerhouse,” Korea places a distinct value on education linked to early recognition of its importance in economic mobility and development throughout Korea’s history, and particularly its history since the Korean War in the early 1950s. As with the rest of the country, Korea’s higher education system has seen rapid growth since the end of the Korean War. Today, Korea boasts over 400 higher education institutions, primarily categorized as junior/community colleges (2-3 years), universities (4 years), and graduate schools. 

A high percentage of Korean professors have earned PhDs from U.S. institutions, with over half of all professors on a nationwide basis, and an even higher percentage of professors at top universities, holding U.S. degrees. Relatedly, course offerings in English have also increased, with around 30% of courses at Korean colleges and universities now taught in English. Some colleges and universities may also include departments or programs in which all courses are taught in English.  In keeping with globalization and Korea’s current status as an advanced economy, such programs have ambitious international goals. (For more information on higher education in Korea, visit the Korean Ministry of Education's Study in Korea website.)  

According to the 2021 Open Doors report, published by the Institute for International Education (IIE), during the 2019-2020 academic year, South Korea ranked 17th among the top 25 destinations of U.S. study abroad students. The U.S. also remains a popular study abroad destination of Korean students, with Korea consistently ranking as the third-largest origin of international students after China and India (a fact particularly significant considering the difference in population size between Korea and these two countries). Thus, the Korean higher education system is uniquely placed to influence the future of international education, while fostering educational and cultural exchange between the United States and Korea.  This emphasis on strong academics is matched by a strong interest in research and development (R&D) as, per the OECD, Korea has one of the world’s highest levels of R&D expenditure. 

More generally, with the spread in popularity of Korean culture, language, and arts worldwide, popularly known as the “Hallyu Wave,” South Korea has taken its place on the world stage as a major influencer of global culture and trends.  The vibrancy of Korea’s growing music and film scenes, reflected in the worldwide fame of BTS, Parasite, and Squid Game, are equally matched by a vibrancy and uniqueness of history extending back to the mythical foundation of Korea with the Gojoseon Dynasty in 2333 BC.  South Korea boasts 15 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, including monasteries, temples, and tombs; palaces, villages, and fortress complexes.  The cultural atmosphere of these sites is reflected in the traditions of dress, dwelling, and daily living still seen in the gracefulness of Hanbok and Hanok, tasted in the savoriness of Kimchi and Korean barbeque, and heard in the strains of Pansori and Samul Nori. 

General Information about the Korean Academic Year

The academic year for higher education institutions in Korea officially starts from March 1 with the opening of the spring semester. The spring semester closes with a final exam period in mid- to late June.

Summer break is approximately two months long, with the fall semester starting the end of August or beginning of September. The fall semester closes with a final exam period in mid-December.

The largest holidays in Korea are Chuseok (fall harvest) and Seollal (lunar new year). The dates of both holidays vary from year to year according to the lunar calendar, with Chuseok falling in September/October and Seollal falling in January/February. Most institutions in Korea go on a short break (typically a five-day weekend) in observance of these holidays.

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